A Long-horned Bee: Subgenus Synhalonia

A male Synhalonia warming up for flight

Long-horned bee species that are active in the spring to early summer are in the genus Eucera. Synhalonia is the only subgenus of Eucera present on the North American continent. Synhalonia comprises 55 species, with most of them occurring in the western states. The three bees featured here might be of the same species, but… Continue reading A Long-horned Bee: Subgenus Synhalonia

Swallowtails

Papilio eurymedon, a Pale Swallowtail foraging on Encelia farinosa or Brittlebush

As I learn more about the behaviors of butterflies, I am getting a little better at photographing them. Swallowtail butterflies, like many other Lepidopterans are fast moving. At this stage in my education, I can usually observe a butterfly in flight and determine within a minute or two whether, with the requisite patience, I have… Continue reading Swallowtails

iNaturalist Observations

Fire Poppy on the Etz Meloy/Backbone trail, Santa Monica Mountains, April 2019

I am spending much of my time in the field and just outside my door taking photographs of plants, flowers and insects with the occasional bird, reptile and mammal included when our paths intersect. Doing this kind of work requires patience and focus. I find that I must slow down and concentrate on my subject.… Continue reading iNaturalist Observations

Bindweed Turret Bee

A Bindweed Turret bee rests on a bindweed flower.

The Bindweed Turret bee, Diadasia bituburculata, is a solitary bee that nests in the ground. Each female digs her own nest and provides sustenance in the form of pollen and nectar packets that she leaves in the nest for the larvae to eat when they hatch.